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November 18, 2014

Victorian vernaculars

Filed under: Latest News — Four Communications @ 10:02 am

Recent film release, Effie, charts the lives and loves of London’s 19th century bohemian set. This melodrama is set in the Victorian era, at a time when art and architecture were combining to create new and interesting styles. The design and decoration integrated within homes built at this time continue to be appreciated today. Large reception rooms designed to impress, decorative ceiling mouldings and attractive tiled floors are sought-after by 21st century buyers keen to live in a striking historic house which incorporates the architectural splendour of The Victorian period.

Wolford Lodge sits 2.5 miles east of the market town of Moreton-in-Marsh, Gloucestershire. This former gentleman’s residence stands in an acre of gardens with far-reaching views. The main house is notable for the honey coloured flagstone floors, which run through most of the ground floor, as well as the heavy panelled and studded oak doors that open onto a large drawing room. The current owner of the property purchased a local church, All Saints Mission House, in order to remodel and add period features to the property, whilst retaining the houses original style. The house has a medieval style, yet many of the period features were added in the 1990’s. These include gothic arched stone mullioned windows finished with a variety of individually carved heads ranging from a king and queen to poor peasants. Outside of the house there is a stone built coach house which includes two historic cast iron loose boxes made by Carron in the 19th century from traditional cannon mould, a studio flat, and a bathroom complete with a Victorian style roll-top bath. The property is on the market for £1,250,000 with our Chipping Campden office (tel.: 01386 840224). For more information please click here.

The Old Vicarage sits on the edge of the pretty village of Milton Abott, Devon, close to the western boundary of the expansive Dartmoor National Park. The property was designed by architect Edward Blore, but the plans were later enhanced by the 6th Duke and Duchess of Bedford. The Grade II listed house is made of rock-faced stone and includes a gabled slate roof and diagonally set grouped ashlar chimney shafts. The Tudor revival style of the house is apparent through the stone mullioned windows and drip moulds. The inside of the five-bedroom house is typically Victorian, including beautifully proportioned main rooms with high ceilings. The dining room includes a fireplace with ornate marble surround, and some fine decorative cornicing. The property is on the market for £925,000 with our Exeter office (tel.: 01392 214222). For more information please click here.

Abbeyfield is a handsome Victorian country house located just outside the village of Tarvin, Cheshire. The property has a Victorian façade, despite the original house dating back to the late 18th century. Both the drawing room and dining room have bay windows overlooking the gardens with window shutters, high ceilings, moulded cornice work, picture rails, pine floors and feature carved oak and white marble fireplaces. The four-bedroom house is complemented by a two-story coach house with three bedrooms. The property includes a heated indoor swimming pool, an astro tennis court and five acres of mature garden and grounds. The property is on the market for £1,150,000 with our Chester office (tel.: 01244 328361). For more information please click here.

Crossland Fosse is a beautifully presented Victorian house, lying between the hamlet of Box End and Bromham, Bedfordshire. The Grade-II listed property is a William and Mary Revival House constructed in a Flemish Bond red brick, with attractive stone mullioned windows and impressive chimney stacks topped with pediments. Inside the six-bedroom property are many original features including a fine staircase with galleried landing, heavy panelled oak doors and decorative moulded ceilings. The luxurious master bedroom suite enjoys access to a decked balcony, and an en-suite bathroom with his and hers dressing rooms. The garden includes areas of formal lawns, as well as a tennis court, heated swimming pool, bespoke summer house and numerous outbuildings. The house benefits from elevated views over the River Ouse and the surrounding countryside. The property is on the market for £2,850,000 with our Wolburn office (tel.: 01525 290641). For more information please click here.

 

November 14, 2014

The coming of age of contemporary classics

Filed under: Latest News — Four Communications @ 5:31 pm

Contemporary properties are increasingly finding favour with buyers who once would only have considered the architectural cachet of period buildings, according to national estate agents Jackson-Stops & Staff, with 44 offices nationwide.

Dawn Carritt, head of Country Houses, Jackson-Stops & Staff, comments, “Buyers are appreciating that new houses present a wealth of lifestyle, financial and environmental benefits for the homeowner. Contemporary properties, whether constructed with sweeping glass and steel cladding or to a more traditional style, are modern classics which will aesthetically stand the test of time. Creating a new house in the classical style is becoming an increasingly popular trend.  Using traditional architectural design and the finest local materials not only creates properties which blend seamlessly in with the local aesthetic but also allows home owners to benefit from the contemporary finish and eco-credentials.”

Contemporary buildings also require very little maintenance. Properties are often constructed using a ‘fabric first’ approach to sustainability, with materials and construction techniques chosen to deliver energy efficiency. This translates into considerable savings for the homeowner and enhances contemporary properties’ appeal when compared to period houses, which tend to require higher investment in upkeep and running costs.